0', 'lgWidth' => '0', '18' => '19673149', 'liteTextId' => '19673149', '19' => ' ', 'ltShortText1' => ' ', '20' => '', 'ltShortText2' => '', '21' => '', 'ltLongText' => '', '22' => '1000', 'totalViews' => '1000', '23' => '1', 'viewsToDate' => '1', '24' => '0', 'impressionPerDay' => '0', '25' => '22379', 'bannerXGroupId' => '22379' ) ) ); $totalImpressions = 1; ?>
NBC Sports Radio
Text Us: 870870
Studio: (504)260.1870
| More

Tom Fitzmorris

Tune in to "The Food Show" for fun talk about restaurants, recipes, reviews and more!

Weekdays on 3WL 1350am Noon-3pm
Saturdays on WWL Noon-3pm
Email: Tom@nomenu.com



Recipe: Tom's Seafood Gumbo

When I was growing up, my mother made gumbo every week, usually twice. She made chicken filé gumbo on Wednesdays, and seafood okra gumbo on Fridays. They tasted utterly different. Her special touch was that she sauteed the okra before adding it to the pot, thereby avoiding the texture problems that some people have with the innards of okra.

Redemption-SeafoodGumbo-

The great truth about gumbo is that no two chefs make it alike. Anybody who tells you that there's only one "right" way to make gumbo is nuts. If you have an idea that you think might make your version better, you should feel free to use it. I've seen just about every imaginable foodstuff in gumbo.

Here's my version. A few points. Not all recipes for seafood gumbo call for making a stock, but I always do, using either the little gumbo crabs that you can buy frozen year round, or the remnants of big boiled crabs. Or shrimp shells or crawfish shells. Or oyster water. It depends on what I have around.

RoyalPalm-Gumbo

Also, following the technique of restaurant chefs, I make the roux separately and add it to the broth well into the process, not at the beginning. This would have been thought of as crazy by my mother, but I think it give you more control over the amount of roux in the soup. My way or hers, this will make a gumbo with a light texture. The very thick gumbos that came into vogue in the last twenty years never seemed as good to me as this one. But cooks can argue about that until the shrimp come home.

Stock:
6 gumbo crabs and/or
4 cups shrimp or crawfish shells and/or
1/2 gallon oyster water, strained
1 small onion, cut up
2 ribs celery, cut up
Stems from one bunch of parsley
1 Tbs. black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
1/2 tsp. thyme
~
Gumbo:
3 Tbs. vegetable oil
2 lbs. okra
2 medium onions, chopped
1 very ripe (turning red) green bell pepper, seeds and membrane removed, chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
2 bay leaves
1/2 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. oregano
1 Tbs. Creole seasoning
Hot sauce
Salt
1/4 cup finely snipped green onions
Pick any two (or pick more, using less of each)
2 lbs. peeled large shrimp and/or
1 lb. claw crabmeat and/or
2 cups crawfish tails and/or
3-4 dozen oysters

Roux:
1/2 cup olive oil (not extra-virgin)
2/3 cup flour
1. Make the stock by bringing about a gallon of water (including oyster water, if available) to a light boil. Add all the remaining stock ingredients. Return to a bare simmer and cook for about 30 minutes. Strain the stock and discard all the solids.

2. In a large pot, heat the vegetable oil until it shimmers. Add the okra and cook, stirring, for about three minutes. Remove the okra and drain the pot, but leave a film of oil in it.

3. Add the onions, bell pepper, and celery. Cook until the vegetables are soft. Then add the stock to the pot, and bring to a simmer. Add the bay leaves, thyme, oregano, and Creole seasoning.

4. While the gumbo simmers, make the roux. Heat the I olive oil in a small saucepan over medium heat until it shimmers. Add the flour and whisk until it changes texture. Then shift to a wooden spoon (preferably one with a flat end)and stir until the roux reaches the color of pecans. Remove the roux pan from the heat.

5. Add a cup of hot gumbo to the roux and whisk it in. Then add about two-thirds of the roux mixture back into the gumbo and whisk it in. Add more warm roux, a little at a time, until the soup is the color and texture that seem right to you. (You might not use all the roux.)

6. Simmer the gumbo for about an hour. Taste and add salt, pepper, and hot sauce to taste. Just before serving, add the shrimp, crabmeat, crawfish tails, and/or oysters. Simmer until the seafoods are heated through–about two or three minutes. Serve with long-grain rice, garnished with the chopped green onions.

Serves eight to twelve.
 (1) Comments




 

Recipe: Tom's peach cobbler

RecipeSquare-150x150Peach cobbler has a great Southern quality in its richly fruity flavor and sweetness. The latter is where the problems can come in: most recipes are, I find, quite a bit too sweet. The peaches (or whatever fruit you use) should be ripe and naturally sweet.

6-8 peaches
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 Tbs. lemon juice
1 scant Tbs. cornstarch, dissolved in 1 Tbs. water

Dough:
4 Tbs. butter
1 1/2 cups self-rising flour
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup milk

Topping:
3 Tbs. brown sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

1. Peel and pit the peaches, and slice each into eight wedge-shaped slices. In a baking dish, toss with the other ingredients through the cornstarch. Cover the dish with foil and bake at 400 degrees for 12-15 minutes, until the peaches are soft and have thrown off some juice.

2. While the peaches are in the oven, cut the butter into the flour, and whisk until the butter disappears into crumbs. Whisk in the sugar.

3. Add the milk and stir lightly with a kitchen fork. Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl until no dry flour remains. (Add a little more milk if necessary.)

4. When the peaches come out of the oven, use one teaspoon to scoop up the dough, and another to push it into the peaches. When all the dough is in the baking dish, stir the contents until the peaches and dough pieces are evenly distributed. Sprinkle the brown sugar and cinnamon over the top.

5. Return the baking dish to the oven and bake, uncovered, for about 30 minutes, or until the tops of the dough are browned. Remove and cool until just warm. Serve in bowls.

Serves six.
 (0) Comments




 

New Year's Recipe: Tom's Baked Blackeye Peas

RecipeSquare-150x150I love blackeye peas, which have a much more assertive taste than most beans. I really think that you have to cook them differently from the way you cook red beans. This method heads off in the direction of barbecue beans, without the sauce. It helps to boil the beans the night before, then bake them all morning long. This is actually my wife’s recipe, and we serve it at most of the casual barbecues we are called upon to do.

1 lb. dried blackeye peas
2/3 cup Steen’s cane syrup
1/2 cup dark brown sugar
4 whole cloves
2 Tbs. Pickapeppa or Tabasco New Orleans steak sauce
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 tsp. summer savory
1 tsp. salt
2 Tbs. Creole mustard
1/2 pound lean bacon, cut into squares
1. Sort through the beans to remove bad ones and dirt, then rinse well. Put them into a pot with enough water to cover them about four inches deep, and bring to a light boil. Boil for one hour.

2. Drain the beans well and put them into a baking dish with all the other ingredients. Mix well.

3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and bring two cups of water to a boil. Top the beans with just enough boiling water to just barely cover them.

4. Put the baking dish into the preheated oven and bake for three hours. Check it every hour, stirring and adding a little more water if the beans seems to be getting dry.

Makes eight to twelve side portions.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics : Hospitality_Recreation
Social :
Locations : New Orleans




 

Christmas recipe: Tom's crawfish pie

RecipeSquareI don’t really like crawfish pie the way it’s usually made–as a thickened crawfish etouffee baked in a little pie shell. This version is a bit richer, more herbal (with an up-front garlic tinge), and less red-peppery. It’s also folded into a triangle of phyllo pastry, and comes out looking like a Middle Eastern spinach pie. That eliminates the worst part of the standard crawfish pie–the fat-logged crust. You can also make these using small vol-au-vents (“patty shells”).

Crawfish are running low at the end of the season, but picked crawfish tail meat is in good supply now. One more thing: resist the temptation to add cheese of any kind.

2 cups Louisiana crawfish tails
1/2 stick butter
4 Tbs. flour
1 tsp. fresh, finely chopped garlic
3/4 cup half-and-half, warmed
2 eggs, beaten
4 slices bacon, fried crisp, drained, then crumbled
1 tsp. lemon juice
10 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, leaves only, chopped
1/2 tsp. dill
1 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. cayenne
1 tsp. paprika
Phyllo pastry sheets
Crawfish pie in phyllo pastry (vol-au-vent). 
Crawfish pie in phyllo pastry (vol-au-vent).
1. If the crawfish tails are very large, cut them into two or three pieces.

2. Heat the butter over medium heat in a saucepan until it bubbles, then stir in the flour and make a blond roux. Don’t allow the roux to brown.

3. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds. Lower the heat to the lowest setting and add the warmed half-and-half. Whisk until the sauce thickens to the texture of light mashed potatoes. Add half of the beaten egg and whisk until blended in.

4. Add add the crawfish and all the other ingredients except the phyllo and the remaining beaten egg. Simmer, stirring once or twice, for about two minutes. Remove from the heat.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

5. Unfold the phyllo pastry and separate ten sheets. Wrap the remainder and return to the box and the refrigerator. Cut the phyllo sheets into three strips, four to five inches wide and twelve to fourteen inches long. Dampen a clean towel and keep it on top of the phyllo you’re not yet using to prevent its drying out.

6. Spoon about two tablespoons of the crawfish mixture onto one end of two thicknesses of phyllo strips. Brush lightly with egg at the other end. Fold the phyllo over the filling at a 45-degree angle, and keep folding over till the end. Seal the edges with your fingers. Set the finished triangles on a greased baking sheet and continue making more until all the filling is gone.

7. Bake the triangles in a 400-degree oven until browned and crisp. Serve immediately, or keep warm for an hour or less.

Serves eight to twelve.
 (0) Comments




 

Christmas recipe: Oyster & Pecan stuffing

I am no fan of oyster dressing. However, everybody asks me about it, so I messed around with a new version into which I added pecans to add some flavor and texture contrast. I must say I liked it, although not everyone was unanimous about this. (The dissenters felt that the standard oyster dressing is a sacrament that should not be changed.) Although you might want to stuff this into a bird, it’s better baked separately.

1 stick butter
1 medium onion, chopped
3 green onions, tender green parts only, finely snipped
1/4 tsp. oregano
1/4 tsp. thyme
Pinch cayenne
1/4 cup dry (white) vermouth
24 oysters, chopped (save the water)
10 inches of a stale poor boy French bread loaf, cut into cubes
10 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, leaves only, chopped
1 cup chopped pecans
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat the butter until it bubbles. Add the onion, green onion, thyme, oregano, and cayenne. Cook until the onions turn translucent.

2. Add the vermouth and bring it to a boil. Lower the heat a little and add the oysters. Poach for about three minutes, or until the oysters curl at the edges. Lower the heat to the lowest setting.

3. Add the oyster water (up to 1/2 cup) and the French bread cubes. Stir to soak the bread cubes with liquid. If the oysters break up a bit as you do this, that’s okay. Let the mixture return to a simmer and hold there for about three minutes.

4. Add the parsley and the chopped pecans. Toss to evenly distribute them in the mixture. It should be fairly loose and wet; tighten it up to a stiff mixture with the bread crumbs, and transfer it to a baking dish.

5. Just before serving, bake, covered, in a 350-degree oven until warm all the way through. Then bake another few minutes uncovered to get a bit of a crust on top.

Serves six to eight.
 (1) Comments




 

Christmas recipe: Savory bread pudding with mushrooms

This is at its best with meaty, wild-tasting mushrooms: portobellos, criminis, shiitakes, chanterelles, porcinis, etc. The best cheeses are the ones that melt well and have an interesting tang: Gruyere, Fontina, Swiss, Provolone, mozzarella. (If you use the latter two, use a little Parmesan, too.)

3 cups half-and-half
4 eggs, beaten
1 tsp. Worcestershire
1/4 tsp. Tabasco
1/4 tsp. salt
1 Tbs. butter
18 inches of a loaf of stale French bread
1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms
3/4 cup thinly sliced green onions
1 1/2 cup shredded Gruyere, Fontina, or other easy-melting white cheese
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

1. Combine the half-and-half, eggs, Worcestershire, Tabasco, and salt in a bowl and blend well. 

2. Slice the bread into thin (about 1/4 inch) slices. Butter the inside of a 9"x5"x4" baking dish or casserole. Place a layer of bread along the bottom. Sprinkle one-third each of the cheese, mushrooms, and green onions over the bread. Pour one-fourth of the milk-egg mixture over this, enough to soak it well. Push down gently until the bread is soaked.

3. Repeat the layers in the same order as above, following with a dousing of liquid. Finish with a layer of bread and the last of the liquid.

4. Place the baking dish in a pan of warm water and put the entire assembly into the preheated oven. Bake for an hour and 15 minutes at 300 degrees. Let it cool for at least a half-hour before serving. It can be sliced, but it’s perfectly fine to spoon it right out of the dish at the table.

Serves eight.
 (0) Comments




 

Recipe: Two types of Christmas oysters

Oysters three ways art Antoine's/It's a tradition at Antoine's to order an appetizer of combining two of the restaurant's baked oyster dishes. Both are baked on their shells, one with a green sauce (their famous oysters Rockefeller), the other with a red sauce. The latter is called oysters thermidor at Antoine's and oysters casino at Brennan's--the only two restaurants I know that serves the dish. The names are misleading, because other dishes that have nothing in common with this one have both those names.

The Rockefellers take longer in the oven, so put them in first. Serve four to six of each to each guest as an appetizer, alternating the green and red ones.

Oysters Rockefeller 
Oysters Rockefeller have always been among my favorite Creole-French dishes, and one that creates its own special occasion when you make it.

Water from oysters, plus enough more water to make one cups
1 cups chopped celery
3/4 cup chopped green onion tops
1 cups chopped parsley, stems removed
1/2 cup chopped fresh fennel
1/2 cup chopped watercress
1/2 tsp. chopped fresh garlic
2 anchovy fillets
1/2 tsp. sugar
2 Tbs. ketchup
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. cayenne
1/2 tsp. white pepper
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 dashes Peychaud's bitters
2 drops green food coloring (optional but authentic)
1 stick butter
1/2 cup flour
3/4 cup  fine bread crumbs
Two dozen oysters on the shells
1. Combine the vegetables and the anchovies  in small batches and chop to a near-puree in a food processor, using the oyster water to help things along.

2. Combine this green slurry and the rest of the oyster water in a saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring every now and then, until the excess water is gone but the greens remain very moist. Add sugar, catsup, salt, cayenne, Worcestershire  sauce, bitters and food coloring.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 

3. Make a blond roux with the butter and flour. Blend well into the greens, until the sauce takes on a different, lighter texture. Then mix in the bread crumbs.

4. Place large, fresh oysters into oyster shells, small ovenproof ramekins, or small au gratin dishes. Top each oyster with a generous tablespoon of sauce (or more, if you like). Bake 15 minutes in a preheated 450-degree oven, or until the top of the sauce has barely begun to brown. Serve immediately. 

Oysters Thermidor (or Casino) 
These are much easier to make than the Rockefellers, fortunately. All you need to do is fry some bacon and mix a few sauce ingredients, then bake on the half-shells.

6 strips thick-sliced bacon
1 cup chili sauce (in bottles next to the ketchup)
1 Tbs. prepared horseradish
2 tsp. lemon juice
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp. Tabasco
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. white pepper
2 dozen oysters on the half shells
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 

1. Cut the bacon slices into four pieces. Fry or broil until just beginning to turn crisp. 

2. Mix all the other ingredients except the oysters in a bowl.

3. Place a piece of bacon atop each oyster. Spoon a generous tablespoon of the sauce on top. Bake six minutes in a preheated 450-degree oven, or until the sauce begins to bubble. Serve immediately.

Serves eight.
 (0) Comments




 

Recipe: Two types of Christmas oysters

Oysters three ways art Antoine's/It's a tradition at Antoine's to order an appetizer of combining two of the restaurant's baked oyster dishes. Both are baked on their shells, one with a green sauce (their famous oysters Rockefeller), the other with a red sauce. The latter is called oysters thermidor at Antoine's and oysters casino at Brennan's--the only two restaurants I know that serves the dish. The names are misleading, because other dishes that have nothing in common with this one have both those names.

The Rockefellers take longer in the oven, so put them in first. Serve four to six of each to each guest as an appetizer, alternating the green and red ones.

Oysters Rockefeller 
Oysters Rockefeller have always been among my favorite Creole-French dishes, and one that creates its own special occasion when you make it.

Water from oysters, plus enough more water to make one cups
1 cups chopped celery
3/4 cup chopped green onion tops
1 cups chopped parsley, stems removed
1/2 cup chopped fresh fennel
1/2 cup chopped watercress
1/2 tsp. chopped fresh garlic
2 anchovy fillets
1/2 tsp. sugar
2 Tbs. ketchup
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. cayenne
1/2 tsp. white pepper
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 dashes Peychaud's bitters
2 drops green food coloring (optional but authentic)
1 stick butter
1/2 cup flour
3/4 cup  fine bread crumbs
Two dozen oysters on the shells
1. Combine the vegetables and the anchovies  in small batches and chop to a near-puree in a food processor, using the oyster water to help things along.

2. Combine this green slurry and the rest of the oyster water in a saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring every now and then, until the excess water is gone but the greens remain very moist. Add sugar, catsup, salt, cayenne, Worcestershire  sauce, bitters and food coloring.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 

3. Make a blond roux with the butter and flour. Blend well into the greens, until the sauce takes on a different, lighter texture. Then mix in the bread crumbs.

4. Place large, fresh oysters into oyster shells, small ovenproof ramekins, or small au gratin dishes. Top each oyster with a generous tablespoon of sauce (or more, if you like). Bake 15 minutes in a preheated 450-degree oven, or until the top of the sauce has barely begun to brown. Serve immediately. 

Oysters Thermidor (or Casino) 
These are much easier to make than the Rockefellers, fortunately. All you need to do is fry some bacon and mix a few sauce ingredients, then bake on the half-shells.

6 strips thick-sliced bacon
1 cup chili sauce (in bottles next to the ketchup)
1 Tbs. prepared horseradish
2 tsp. lemon juice
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
1/4 tsp. Tabasco
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. white pepper
2 dozen oysters on the half shells
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 

1. Cut the bacon slices into four pieces. Fry or broil until just beginning to turn crisp. 

2. Mix all the other ingredients except the oysters in a bowl.

3. Place a piece of bacon atop each oyster. Spoon a generous tablespoon of the sauce on top. Bake six minutes in a preheated 450-degree oven, or until the sauce begins to bubble. Serve immediately.

Serves eight.
 (0) Comments




 

Christmas recipe: Roast goose with pecan rice stuffing

No dish is more traditional for Christmas than a roast goose. It's a dark-meat bird, like a  duck, and very flavorful. You will not have much trouble finding a goose in the store (it will be a frozen bird, likely). However, you must get started on it four or five days ahead, and that's why I'm telling you about it now. It's a bit of work to get it on the table, but its flavor is impressive. What's more, most people at the table will never have had it before. And it goes with all the traditional side dishes.

1 goose, 10 to 14 pounds, neck and giblets removed
1 rib celery, cut up
1/2 onion, cut up
2 cups Konriko Wild Pecan Rice
1/2 stick butter
1/4 cup chopped green onions
1 cup crushed pecans
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. Tabasco
1. This step needs to be done two days before your dinner. After thawing in the refrigerator, the goose needs to be par-boiled. Fill a pot large enough to hold the bird half full with water, and bring it to a rolling boil. Carefully lower the goose into the water, and cook until the water returns to a boil. Even more carefully remove the goose from the water and place on a pan. With needlenose pliers, pull out any feather stubble. Then put it uncovered into your refrigerator for two days. This will make the skin crisp. If you don't have time for this step, it will not ruin the bird, but it's a desirable touch.

2. The morning of the dinner, make a stock by boiling the neck, celery, and onion in one quart of water for about an hour. Strain, skim off the fat, and reserve the stock. 

3. For the stuffing, heat the butter in a saucepan and saute the  green onions and the coarsely-chopped giblets. Remove the solid contents and add the uncooked rice to the remaining butter. Stir to coat well. Then add three cups of the stock. Cover and cook over very low heat for 30 minutes. Stir the giblet mixture, the pecans, salt, and Tabasco in. Cook uncovered for another five minutes, stirring once.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.

4. Stuff as much of the rice stuffing as will fit inside the goose. Tie the legs across the cavity to hold the stuffing in place. With the point of a knife, prick the skin all over. 

5. Put the goose breast side down on a rack in a broiling pan, and into the preheated oven. Lower the heat to 375 immediately. Let the goose roast for 45 minutes at that temperature, then turn the oven down to 300 and let it keep going until you register a temperature of 180 degrees with the meat thermometer in the thigh (not touching bone, nor poking into the cavity). for between an hour and a half and two hours. 

You will not need to turn the goose, nor will you need to baste it. However, it may be necessary to spoon some of the fat from the pan (you'll be astonished how much there will be!). 

6. Remove the goose from the pan and place, with the rack, on a clean pan. Return to the oven and increase the heat to 450 to crisp the skin for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the drippings into a gravy separator and remove the fat. Use the juices and browned bits to make a gravy, just as you would for a turkey. 

7. A goose is a little hard to carve, so show everybody the whole thing then take it back to the kitchen for the inevitable wrestling match. Those joints do not come apart as easily as they do for a turkey. Serve with gravy and stuffing on the side.

Serves about eight.
 (0) Comments




 

Christmas recipe: Tom's Root-Beer Glazed Ham

Ham, after.Here's the ham after the three- to four-hour baking. You will have a hard time holding back those who want to cut off the crusty glazed outer quarter-inch and munch on it as a snack. In New Orleans, we use the superb, locally-produced Chisesi ham for this. Otherwise, a top-quality, lean, naturally-smoked boneless ham is what you want. The drippings get so crusty that you'll want to use a disposable pan to bake the ham. The stuff is impossible to dislodge.

Glaze:
24 oz. (two cans) Barq's root beer
1 1/2 Tbs. pepper jelly
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 Tbs. Tabasco Caribbean style steak sauce (or Pickapeppa)
6 cloves
1 stick cinnamon
Peel and juice of one-half an orange
Peel of half a lemon
1 cured, smoked ham, about 10-14 pounds
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
3/4 cup dark brown sugar
1. I usually make the glaze the  night before, so I can get the ham right into the oven in the morning. Combine all the glaze ingredients in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, then lower to a simmer, and cook for about a half-hour. Strain the pan contents and discard the solids. Reduce the liquid to about a half-cup. Refrigerate if you do this in advance.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Place the ham on a rack in a disposable aluminum pan. Cut shallow gashes in a criss-cross pattern across the top half. Spoon the glaze over the ham to completely wet the surface.

3. Combine the brown sugar and the dry mustard and pat it all over the ham. Pour a half-cup of water into the pan. Put the ham in the oven at 350 degrees.

4. Spoon some of the glaze over the top of the ham at 15-minute intervals until it's all used up. Try to get some glaze on all parts of the ham. Add more water to the pan when it dries up. 

5. Continue baking until the ham reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees on a meat thermometer. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for a half-hour before carving.

Serves twenty to thirty.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics : Hospitality_Recreation
Social :
Locations : New Orleans




 
Recent Posts
Categories
Tag Cloud
No Tags Found !
Archives