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4th of July Events



 
 

Orleans Parish

July 3, 5:30-9pm
City Park New Orleans Happy 3rd of July
Enjoy patriotic music with  The Marine Corps Band and fireworks.
Bring your chairs & blankets and enjoy patriotic music with The Marine Corps Band on the Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn and fireworks at the Peristyle.
Concessions are available for purchase or you can bring your own picnic.
The Happy 3rd of July event is FREE and open to the public.

July 4, 9pm
"Go 4th On The River," between the French Quarter and Algiers
 -The big Fourth of July Celebration in New Orleans in along the Mississippi River.   Riverfront Marketing Group invites you to come by the riverside to celebrate the Fourth of July at 24th annual Go 4th on the River Dueling Barges Fireworks Show.
Organizers say it is ranked in the top five "must see" displays in the United States by the American Pyrotechnic Association.
Click here for more...


Jefferson Parish

July 3, 3:00-9pm
Uncle Sam Jam Lafreniere Park Music & Fireworks featuring Lee Greenwood
Free Admission
Bring your blankets and chairs. Fireworks at 9pm
Live DJ Music and live bands
5:30-7pm Christian Serpas & Ghost Town
7:30-9:00pm  Lee Greenwood
9:30-11pm Jana Kramer

July 3, 7pm
New Orleans Zephyrs vs. Round Rock with postgame fireworks Thristy Thursday $1 soft drinks and draft beer and $2 cans of beer
Independence Day Celebration
Mini Flag Giveway 1st 6,000 fans.

July 3, about 9:30pm
City of Kenner Fireworks Show
The City of Kenner and the Treasure Chest will team up for a lakefront fireworks show. The show can viewed from Laketown, or for people 21 or older, from any of the three decks of the Treasure Chest riverboat casino.

July 4, 10am-8pm
Bucktown Bash & Blessing of the Fleet
Bucktown Harbor, Hammond Highway-over the levee
Admission: $5 Adults, Children 12 and younger are free
Live music, Arts & Crafts, Louisiana Seafood, and activites for the kids
Blessing of the Fleet to begin at 12:30pm
Music lineup:
12:30-1:30pm- The Quickening
2-3pm- Bucktown All-Stars
3:30-4:30pm- The Breton Sound
5-6pm- Zebra
6:45-8pm Leon Russell

July 4th 7-10pm
Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market
Music, food, fireworks show at 10 p.m.
484 Sala Ave., Westwego
Free admission


July 4th 7:30-10pm
4th of July at Boomtown Casino in Harvey
Enjoy Fireworks at 9:30pm on Boomers Back Porch. Food and drinks will be available. Live In Boomers, join the free after party with Karma, featuring Top 40 and variety hits.

July 5  8-10pm
Celebrate Independence Day weekend with fireworks and live music at Bridge Side Marina on Grand Isle.
The Chase Tyler band, a country artist from Baton Rouge, plays at 8 p.m.
Fireworks show starting at 10 p.m.
Bridge Side Marina is located at 1618 LA Highway 1 on Grand Isle.

St. Charles Parish

July 3 6-9pm
St Charles Parish 24th annual Independence Day Celebration
West Bank Bridge Park, 13825 River Road
The event will feature a performace from the band Category 6, two patriotic-twisting clowns, mini golf for the kids, food and more.
The band is scheduled to begin at approximately 6:20pm with a 20-minute firework extravaganza to begin at 9pm

St. Tammany Parish

June 29  5:30 to 9:00pm
Mandeville Celebrates America hosted by Mandeville’s First Baptist Church
1895 Hwy 190, Mandeville, la   70448
Food concessions 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Fireworks show
Music by: Redemption Family Band
Concert guests "Amanda Shaw and the Cute Guys"
Antique car displays
Inflatables and games for the kids
Snowballs, popcorn, cotton candy
Free food from great restaurants of Mandeville

July 4 Noon till Midnight
Mandeville City Seafood Festival and Fireworks in Fontainebleu Park
Bands:
Supercharger: 1-3pm
4 Unplugged 4-6pm
The Grass Roots 7-9pm
Jefferson Starship 10pm-12am
Adult Tickets $20 Children $10
Food, Crafts, children's rides, fireworks

July 4 4-11pm
Slidell Heritage Festival
Hertiage Park along the banks of Bayou Bonfouca
The featured bands this year:
Voodoo Gumbo 5:30-7pm
Boogie Men 7:30-9:00pm
Molly Ringwalds 9:30-11pm
9pm Fireworks with music provided by the Northlake Perfoming Arts Society
$8 entry fee. Kids 12 and under get in free with an adult.

St. Bernard Parish

July 4 4:30-9:30pm
Live Music, food,face painting, and a firework spectacular in Torress Park in Chalmette.
Admission is free
Schedule:
4:30-6:00pm Amanda Shaw
6pm- Hot Dog Contest
6:30-10:30pm- The Top Cats
Fireworks Display at 9pm

 
 

The best advice for anyone considering consumer fireworks as part of their holiday celebration:  Fireworks are best enjoyed at a community display, not in your backyard.

  • Pay attention to the instructions and warnings.
  • Be prepared with a bucket of water nearby in case of a malfunctioning firework.
  • Be sure to set off the fireworks in an area clear of people.
  • Fireworks should only be lit away from homes and other buildings, trees and cars. Never light fireworks in the grass, but always on a smooth, flat surface like concrete or pavement.
  • If a firework does not ignite, do not attempt to re-light it.
  • Never allow children to touch, handle or light fireworks.


ER Statistics:

  • 8,500 injuries are reported annually in the U.S.  2,000 are eye injuries
  • 600 result in permanet  eye damage
  • 500 result in permanet vision loss or blindness
  • 25% of all eye injuries caused by consumer fireworks happen to bystanders.
  • 75 % of all fireworks-related eye injuries happen to boys between the ages of 13 and 15

Statistics provided by Ochsner Health System

 
  Click here to download the document
 
 

STANDARDS of RESPECT

The Flag Code, which formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which we give respect to the flag, also contains specific instructions on how the flag is not to be used. They are:

  • The flag should never be dipped to any person or thing. It is flown upside down only as a distress signal.
  • The flag should not be used as a drapery, or for covering a speakers desk, draping a platform, or for any decoration in general. Bunting of blue, white and red stripes is available for these purposes. The blue stripe of the bunting should be on the top.
  • The flag should never be used for any advertising purpose. It should not be embroidered, printed or otherwise impressed on such articles as cushions, handkerchiefs, napkins, boxes, or anything intended to be discarded after temporary use. Advertising signs should not be attached to the staff or halyard.
  • The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, fireman, policeman and members of patriotic organizations.
  • The flag should never have placed on it, or attached to it, any mark, insignia, letter, word, number, figure, or drawing of any kind.
  • The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.
  • When the flag is lowered, no part of it should touch the ground or any other object; it should be received by waiting hands and arms. To store the flag it should be folded neatly and ceremoniously.
  • The flag should be cleaned and mended when necessary.
  • When a flag is so worn it is no longer fit to serve as a symbol of our country, it should be destroyed by burning in a dignified manner.

Note: Most American Legion Posts regularly conduct a dignified flag burning ceremony, often on Flag Day, June 14th. Many Cub Scout Packs, Boy Scout Troops, and Girl Scout Troops retire flags regularly as well. Contact your local American Legion Hall or Scout Troop to inquire about the availability of this service.

Folding the Flag



Displaying the Flag Outdoors
When the flag is displayed from a staff projecting from a window, balcony, or a building, the union should be at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff.

When it is displayed from the same flagpole with another flag - of a state, community, society or Scout unit - the flag of the United States must always be at the top except that the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for Navy personnel when conducted by a Naval chaplain on a ship at sea.

When the flag is displayed over a street, it should be hung vertically, with the union to the north or east. If the flag is suspended over a sidewalk, the flag's union should be farthest from the building.

When flown with flags of states, communities, or societies on separate flag poles which are of the same height and in a straight line, the flag of the United States is always placed in the position of honor - to its own right.
-The other flags may be smaller but none may be larger.
-No other flag ever should be placed above it.
-The flag of the United States is always the first flag raised and the last to be lowered.

When flown with the national banner of other countries, each flag must be displayed from a separate pole of the same height. Each flag should be the same size. They should be raised and lowered simultaneously. The flag of one nation may not be displayed above that of another nation.


Raising and Lowering the Flag
The flag should be raised briskly and lowered slowly and ceremoniously. Ordinarily it should be displayed only between sunrise and sunset. It should be illuminated if displayed at night.
The flag of the United States of America is saluted as it is hoisted and lowered. The salute is held until the flag is unsnapped from the halyard or through the last note of music, whichever is the longest.


Displaying the Flag Indoors
When on display, the flag is accorded the place of honor, always positioned to its own right. Place it to the right of the speaker or staging area or sanctuary. Other flags should be to the left.

The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of states, localities, or societies are grouped for display.

When one flag is used with the flag of the United States of America and the staffs are crossed, the flag of the United States is placed on its own right with its staff in front of the other flag.

When displaying the flag against a wall, vertically or horizontally, the flag's union (stars) should be at the top, to the flag's own right, and to the observer's left.


Parading and Saluting the Flag
When carried in a procession, the flag should be to the right of the marchers. When other flags are carried, the flag of the United States may be centered in front of the others or carried to their right. When the flag passes in a procession, or when it is hoisted or lowered, all should face the flag and salute.


The Salute
To salute, all persons come to attention. Those in uniform give the appropriate formal salute. Citizens not in uniform salute by placing their right hand over the heart and men with head cover should remove it and hold it to left shoulder, hand over the heart. Members of organizations in formation salute upon command of the person in charge.


The Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem
The pledge of allegiance should be rendered by standing at attention, facing the flag, and saluting.
When the national anthem is played or sung, citizens should stand at attention and salute at the first note and hold the salute through the last note. The salute is directed to the flag, if displayed, otherwise to the music.


The Flag in Mourning
To place the flag at half staff, hoist it to the peak for an instant and lower it to a position half way between the top and bottom of the staff. The flag is to be raised again to the peak for a moment before it is lowered. On Memorial Day the flag is displayed at half staff until noon and at full staff from noon to sunset.

The flag is to be flown at half staff in mourning for designated, principal government leaders and upon presidential or gubernatorial order.

When used to cover a casket, the flag should be placed with the union at the head and over the left shoulder. It should not be lowered into the grave.

 
 

Evolution of the United States Flag
No one knows with absolute certainty who designed the first stars and stripes or who made it. Congressman Francis Hopkinson seems most likely to have designed it, and few historians believe that Betsy Ross, a Philadelphia seamstress, made the first one.

Until the Executive Order of June 24, 1912, neither the order of the stars nor the proportions of the flag was prescribed. Consequently, flags dating before this period sometimes show unusual arrangements of the stars and odd proportions, these features being left to the discretion of the flag maker. In general, however, straight rows of stars and proportions similar to those later adopted officially were used. The principal acts affecting the flag of the United States are the following:


On June 14, 1777, in order to establish an official flag for the new nation, the Continental Congress passed the first Flag Act: "Resolved, That the flag of the United States be made of thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation."

Act of January 13, 1794 - provided for 15 stripes and 15 stars after May 1795.

Act of April 4, 1818 - provided for 13 stripes and one star for each state, to be added to the flag on the 4th of July following the admission of each new state, signed by President Monroe.

Executive Order of President Taft dated June 24, 1912 - established proportions of the flag and provided for arrangement of the stars in six horizontal rows of eight each, a single point of each star to be upward.
Executive Order of President Eisenhower dated January 3, 1959 - provided for the arrangement of the stars in seven rows of seven stars each, staggered horizontally and vertically.

Executive Order of President Eisenhower dated August 21, 1959 - provided for the arrangement of the stars in nine rows of stars staggered horizon tally and eleven rows of stars staggered vertically.


The original Pledge of Allegiance
"I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands- one nation indivisible-with liberty and justice for all."

On September 8,1892, the Boston based "The Youth's Companion" magazine published a few words for students to repeat on Columbus Day that year. Written by Francis Bellamy,the circulation manager and native of Rome, New York, and reprinted on thousands of leaflets, was sent out to public schools across the country. On October 12, 1892, the quadricentennial of Columbus' arrival, more than 12 million children recited the Pledge of Allegiance, thus beginning a required school-day ritual.

At the first National Flag Conference in Washington D.C., on June14, 1923, a change was made. For clarity, the words "the Flag of the United States" replaced "my flag". In the following years various other changes were suggested but were never formally adopted.

It was not until 1942 that Congress officially recognized the Pledge of Allegiance. One year later, in June 1943, the Supreme Court ruled that school children could not be forced to recite it. In fact,today only half of our fifty states have laws that encourage the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in the classroom!

In June of 1954 an amendment was made to add the words "under God". Then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower said "In this way we are reaffirming the transcendence of religious faith in America's heritage and future; in this way we shall constantly strengthen those spiritual weapons which forever will be our country's most powerful resource in peace and war."


The History Of Flag Day
The Fourth of July was traditionally celebrated as America's birthday, but the idea of an annual day specifically celebrating the Flag is believed to have first originated in 1885. BJ Cigrand, a schoolteacher, arranged for the pupils in the Fredonia, Wisconsin Public School, District 6, to observe June 14 (the 108th anniversary of the official adoption of The Stars and Stripes) as 'Flag Birthday'. In numerous magazines and newspaper articles and public addresses over the following years, Cigrand continued to enthusiastically advocate the observance of June 14 as 'Flag Birthday', or 'Flag Day'.

On June 14, 1889, George Balch, a kindergarten teacher in New York City, planned appropriate ceremonies for the children of his school, and his idea of observing Flag Day was later adopted by the State Board of Education of New York. On June 14, 1891, the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia held a Flag Day celebration, and on June 14 of the following year, the New York Society of the Sons of the Revolution, celebrated Flag Day.

Following the suggestion of Colonel J Granville Leach (at the time historian of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution), the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames of America on April 25, 1893 adopted a resolution requesting the mayor of Philadelphia and all others in authority and all private citizens to display the Flag on June 14th. Leach went on to recommend that thereafter the day be known as 'Flag Day', and on that day, school children be assembled for appropriate exercises, with each child being given a small Flag.

Two weeks later on May 8th, the Board of Managers of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution unanimously endorsed the action of the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames. As a result of the resolution, Dr. Edward Brooks, then Superintendent of Public Schools of Philadelphia, directed that Flag Day exercises be held on June 14, 1893 in Independence Square. School children were assembled, each carrying a small Flag, and patriotic songs were sung and addresses delivered.

In 1894, the governor of New York directed that on June 14 the Flag be displayed on all public buildings. With BJ Cigrand and Leroy Van Horn as the moving spirits, the Illinois organization, known as the American Flag Day Association, was organized for the purpose of promoting the holding of Flag Day exercises. On June 14th, 1894, under the auspices of this association, the first general public school children's celebration of Flag Day in Chicago was held in Douglas, Garfield, Humboldt, Lincoln, and Washington Parks, with more than 300,000 children participating.

Adults, too, participated in patriotic programs. Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior, delivered a 1914 Flag Day address in which he repeated words he said the flag had spoken to him that morning: "I am what you make me; nothing more. I swing before your eyes as a bright gleam of color, a symbol of yourself."

Inspired by these three decades of state and local celebrations, Flag Day - the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777 - was officially established by the Proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30th, 1916. While Flag Day was celebrated in various communities for years after Wilson's proclamation, it was not until August 3rd, 1949, that President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14th of each year as National Flag Day.

"OLD GLORY!"
This famous name was coined by Captain William Driver, a shipmaster of Salem, Massachusetts, in 1831. As he was leaving on one of his many voyages aboard the brig CHARLES DOGGETT - and this one would climax with the rescue of the mutineers of the BOUNTY - some friends presented him with a beautiful flag of twenty four stars. As the banner opened to the ocean breeze for the first time, he exclaimed "Old Glory!"
He retired to Nashville in 1837, taking his treasured flag from his sea days with him. By the time the Civil War erupted, most everyone in and around Nashville recognized Captain Driver's "Old Glory." When Tennesee seceded from the Union, Rebels were determined to destroy his flag, but repeated searches revealed no trace of the hated banner.

Then on February 25th, 1862, Union forces captured Nashville and raised the American flag over the capital. It was a rather small ensign and immediately folks began asking Captain Driver if "Old Glory" still existed. Happy to have soldiers with him this time, Captain Driver went home and began ripping at the seams of his bedcover. As the stitches holding the quilt-top to the batting unraveled, the onlookers peered inside and saw the 24-starred original "Old Glory"!

Captain Driver gently gathered up the flag and returned with the soldiers to the capitol. Though he was sixty years old, the Captain climbed up to the tower to replace the smaller banner with his beloved flag. The Sixth Ohio Regiment cheered and saluted - and later adopted the nickname "Old Glory" as their own, telling and re-telling the story of Captain Driver's devotion to the flag we honor yet today.

Captain Driver's grave is located in the old Nashville City Cemetery, and is one of three (3) places authorized by act of Congress where the Flag of the United States may be flown 24 hours a day.

 

A caption above a faded black and white picture in the book, The Stars and the Stripes, states that " 'Old Glory' may no longer be opened to be photographed, and no color photograph is available." Visible in the photo in the lower right corner of the canton is an appliqued anchor, Captain Driver's very personal note. "Old Glory" is the most illustrious of a number of flags - both Northern and Confederate - reputed to have been similarly hidden, then later revealed as times changed. The flag was given to his granddaughter or neice and she later donated it to the Smithsonian.

 
 

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