Health News

FILE – In this November 2005 file photo, Larry Greene, public information director of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility, demonstrates how a curtain is pulled between the death chamber and witness room at the prison in Lucasville, Ohio. Legal arguments over the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection process, and specifically the effectiveness of the sedative midazolam, are set to be heard by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Cincinnati, months before the state hopes to start carrying out executions again. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
February 20, 2017 - 11:37 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A federal appeals court will hear arguments Tuesday over the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection process as the state tries to start carrying out executions once again. At issue is whether a contested sedative, midazolam, is powerful enough to put inmates into a deep...
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FILE - This Aug. 25, 2015, file photo, Karrie Galloway, CEO of Planned Parenthood Action Council, laughs as the roar of the crowd drowns out her speech at the state Capitol in Salt Lake City. Galloway says her doctors are trying to comply with the law, but there is no clear guidance in the law or from state officials on how to do so. (Leah Hogsten/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
February 20, 2017 - 2:46 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Last year, Utah enacted a first-in-the-nation law requiring that fetuses receive anesthesia or painkillers before elective abortions starting at 20 weeks gestation. Nine months later, the only licensed clinic providing those abortions in the state says no changes have been...
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February 20, 2017 - 1:42 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Teen suicide attempts in the U.S. declined after same-sex marriage became legal and the biggest impact was among gay, lesbian and bisexual kids, a study found. The research found declines in states that passed laws allowing gays to marry before the Supreme Court made it legal...
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FILE - This Aug. 25, 2015, file photo, Karrie Galloway, CEO of Planned Parenthood Action Council, laughs as the roar of the crowd drowns out her speech at the state Capitol in Salt Lake City. Galloway says her doctors are trying to comply with the law, but there is no clear guidance in the law or from state officials on how to do so. (Leah Hogsten/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
February 20, 2017 - 9:40 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Last year, Utah enacted a first-in-the-nation law requiring that fetuses receive anesthesia or painkillers before elective abortions starting at 20 weeks gestation. Nine months later, the only licensed clinic providing those abortions in the state says no changes have been...
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FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. arrives with Health and Human Services Secretary-designate, Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga. on Capitol Hill in Washington, for a closed-door GOP strategy session. Top House Republicans say their outline for replacing President Barack Obama’s health care law is a pathway to greater flexibility and lower costs for consumers. Democrats see it as a road to ruin that will mean lost coverage and bigger medical expenses for millions, particularly poorer people.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
February 20, 2017 - 2:15 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top House Republicans say their outline for replacing President Barack Obama's health care law is a pathway to greater flexibility and lower costs for consumers. Democrats see a road to ruin for millions who'd face lost coverage and higher medical expenses, particularly the poor...
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February 20, 2017 - 1:52 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Last year, Utah enacted a first-in-the-nation law requiring that fetuses receive anesthesia or painkillers before elective abortions starting at 20 weeks gestation. Nine months later, the only licensed clinic providing those abortions in the state says no changes have been...
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FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2010, file photo a Franklin County police officer counts pills containing pseudoephedrine during a raid of a suspected meth house in Gerald, Mo. Methamphetamines continue to make an alarming surge in Montana, as law enforcement, health officials and communities struggle to address the problem. Panelists at a drug summit convened Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, by the Montana Legislature said resources are being strained because of a widening prevalence of the drug. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
February 18, 2017 - 9:53 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Methamphetamines continue to make an alarming surge in Montana, as law enforcement, health officials and communities struggle to address the problem. Panelists at a drug summit convened Saturday by the Montana Legislature said resources are being strained because of a widening...
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