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Scoot Blog: New Orleans -- No Place Like Home!

PORTLAND, OREGON: As I sit at breakfast in Portland this morning, I couldn’t decide if this is like being in another country or if living in New Orleans is like living in another country! Since I lived here and did a talk radio show here for two years, I was surprised that I felt like I was in a foreign place – and not in a negative way.
 
Portland is different. The attitudes, the styles and the physical surroundings are as distant from New Orleans as the miles that separate the two cities. This trip has reminded me that we live in a country on a planet that offers wonderful visual and cultural diversity.
 
It’s natural to compare a place where you have lived with the place where you currently live, but the instinctive comparisons have led me a comforting conclusion. There is a type of courtesy among wait staff and hourly employees in this part of the country that is admirable. However, I instantly think of the unique style of courtesy we have in New Orleans. Only in New Orleans do you hear from an unfamiliar waitress say, “What can I get you, baby?” or “Are you doing alright honey?”
 
There are always things we can learn from other parts of the country and I have always promoted the idea that just because we do something one way in New Orleans is not mean it’s  the best way. 
 
I consider myself blessed because I am from the incredible city of New Orleans, but I have had the opportunity to live and work in many great cities around this amazing country we live in. From Seattle I moved to Portland and spent about four years in the Pacific Northwest. This is a beautiful part of America. (At the end of this blog there is a picture of me at Multnomah Falls, which is about 30 mins. outside of Portland in the Cascades and a picture of where I am writing this blog – in a restaurant that is built like a log cabin!) But I remember when I was living here I would see scenes on TV or in movies of the bayou, the cypress trees in the swamp and the French Quarter and miss the natural and historic beauty of my home – New Orleans!
 
Experiencing different parts of the country reminds us that America is a wonderfully diverse country, both geographically and emotionally. I love the perspective of this land that God has blessed me with. 
 
Later this month, my son and his girlfriend will be coming to New Orleans and it will be her first trip to the city. We have been talking about all the unique things about New Orleans and I love bragging about my city. We all enjoy being in the company of those who are experiencing New Orleans for the first time!
 
It has been great to visit my son and one of the places that was my home for a brief part of my radio career, but even as I sit here in this beautiful part of America, I am thinking about my apartment in downtown New Orleans – the view, the location, the people and the historic beauty.  I also think about how the sensation of living in New Orleans cannot always be reduced to words – it is something that must be experienced!
 
While I can appreciate many different parts of this country, I repeat the words I learned as a kid watching “The Wizard of Oz” – “There’s no place like home!” I’ll be back on the air Wednesday night!

 


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Topics : Human Interest
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Locations : New OrleansOregonPortlandSeattle




 
01/08/2013 7:55PM
Scoot Blog: New Orleans -- No Place Like Home!
Please Enter Your Comments Below
01/08/2013 10:16PM
Miss you
Have a great trip. Come home soon.
01/08/2013 11:37PM
nola.com
Just as you have done, I have spent a fourth of my life living in other cities. No matter the problems of the New Orleans region, coming back after many years in other lands, actually cities in this country, I have returned to the place that I grew up in and know and instantly re-established my kinmanship in the land that I love with the people that I love. Rock on Scoot
01/10/2013 11:08AM
Well said
I too have traveled alot and have been blessed by living in an area just outside of Seattle. A truly beautiful place. We were lucky enough to be able to relocate back to the MS Gulf Coast and are able to travel to New Orleans a lot. While away, the homesickness for the great food, festivals and one of a kind friendlness was missed. The Pacific Northwest is a beautiful place and met a lot of nice people but nowhere is New Orleans. We are so glad to be back. Proud to be a Who Dat and look forward to the 2013 festivals and next Saints season.
01/10/2013 5:59PM
BM Alum in PNW
Scoot, I wish I was just a tourist in Portland or Seattle, but I have lived here for far too long. I have also lived in NYC, L.A., Seoul, Singapore, Munich/Austria, and Jamaica. The PNW is by far the worst place I have ever lived in terms of the people. In oregon, especially, they seem to hate everyone from outside the area, unless you conform exactly to their sense of the world, which is dictated exclusively by local politics. It's a beautiful place - in the summer - otherwise the place is fraught with misery and back-stabbers. We survive here being New Orleanians and knowing who to let into our lives, while leaving the rest out. I come home (NOLA) 2-3 times per year, and just completed a 3 week stint in the city. Thank God as it allows me to keep the proper perspective and leave these mentally ill people to their own miserable issues as I pass them by. I don't like it here. Once I leave for good, I will NEVER return. Awful people. Awful climate, even worse than ours. lol
01/10/2013 6:06PM
BM Alum in PNW
BTW, I forgot to answer the point of who is different, us or them. I have thought about this often and discussed it with friends I grew up with in New Orleans. There is no doubt that we are the ones who are different. I used to think everyone else was different and that people in Portland were just flat out nuts and mentally ill. They are. But we are the ones who are different, and I thank God for being a New Orleanian. It truly shapes who I am. People outside the area either love us or hate us. There is no in between. Unfortunately, more people out here do not socially, culturally or politically approve of us than those who do. C'est la vie.
01/10/2013 8:07PM
Hurry home
I had to find out where you are. I need you back on the radio at night, to listen to you before falling asleep. I live near Temple, TX. When will you return to the radio program? BW. 01/10/2012
01/12/2013 12:24PM
Love Seattle
I have to take issue with BM Alum. I lived in Seattle for five years. It took me two years to adjust to the miserable fall and winter weather -- and yes, people tend to be very reserved towards outsiders. But, once they get to know you, they can be some of the nicest and most open people in America. I'm still great friends with people from there to this day. Is all of that so different than New Orleans? What if I came to New Orleans, and was disrespectful of local customs -- what if I had a bad attitude towards Catholic traditions, festivals, jazz musicians, and college football? Wouldn't I be shunned? Every place has its own culture and societal politics, but Seattle, to me, will always be one of the great American cities. Great -- underrated restaurants, and breathtaking physical beauty with the mountains, the evergreens, and Puget Sound.
01/14/2013 12:58PM
BM Alum in PNW
First of all, Portland is a little different than Seattle. Not much, but a little different. Seattle is more cosmopolitan and has more transplants. That said, I saw horrific treatment of women and children from La. at the Saints-Seattle playoff game in 2010. I was there. A buddy of mine and I almost had to jump in several times to defend them. I was amazed that a fight didn't break out (and there were reports of numerous fights, including reports made to WWL and the TP). When Seattle fan couldn't find Saints fan to fight, he would look to fight fellow Seattle fan. I'll still go to Seattle for a non-descript visit in the Summer, but I will never set foot in Seahawks stadium again. Of course, anyone who disrespects our traditions will be treated hostily in NOLA, but I did not do that to them. I just walked about the area. Watching people slam religion, slam the South, and slam a Katrina-ravaged New Orleans, among other things, was enough for me. I have been here longer than 5 years, and maybe that is the difference. I mostly hate the PNW. Not completely, but I am very leery and suspicious of the people there. I could tell you story after story, here's one. My old Grandmother was visiting me here form back home. We went to Mt. St. Helens. We stopped at a gas station coming down the mountain near I-5. She fell outside. Instead of anyone coming to help her, several people laughed at her. These were people in their late teens up to about 30, and happened both inside and outside the station (I think it was a 76). I ran outside, helped her up and back to the car, and then proceeded to curse out every single hillbilly in the joint. Not surprisingly, all laughing and hillbilly behavior ceased. I go to Morning Call in Metairie and coincidentally a similar situation occurred. No laughing, just 3 guys rushing to aid the old lady up from her fall, including me. People in the PNW appear to be polite, but they truly have no manners and are classless often times. You can keep it, Love Seattle, I'll keep New Orleans and the South.
01/14/2013 1:00PM
BM Alum in PNW
First of all, Portland is a little different than Seattle. Not much, but a little different. Seattle is more cosmopolitan and has more transplants. That said, I saw horrific treatment of women and children from La. at the Saints-Seattle playoff game in 2010. I was there. A buddy of mine and I almost had to jump in several times to defend them. I was amazed that a fight didn't break out (and there were reports of numerous fights, including reports made to WWL and the TP). When Seattle fan couldn't find Saints fan to fight, he would look to fight fellow Seattle fan. I'll still go to Seattle for a non-descript visit in the Summer, but I will never set foot in Seahawks stadium again. Of course, anyone who disrespects our traditions will be treated hostily in NOLA, but I did not do that to them. I just walked about the area. Watching people slam religion, slam the South, and slam a Katrina-ravaged New Orleans, among other things, was enough for me. I have been here longer than 5 years, and maybe that is the difference. I mostly dislike the PNW. Not completely, but I am very leery and suspicious of the people there. I could tell you story after story, here's one. My old Grandmother was visiting me here form back home. We went to Mt. St. Helens. We stopped at a gas station coming down the mountain near I-5. She fell outside. Instead of anyone coming to help her, several people laughed at her. These were people in their late teens up to about 30, and happened both inside and outside the station (I think it was a 76). I ran outside, helped her up and back to the car, and then proceeded to curse out every single h*llbilly in the joint. Not surprisingly, all laughing and h*llbilly behavior ceased. I go to Morning Call in Metairie and coincidentally a similar situation occurred. No laughing, just 3 guys rushing to aid the old lady up from her fall, including me. People in the PNW appear to be polite, but they truly have no manners and are without class often times. You can keep it, Love Seattle, I'll keep New Orleans and the South.
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